CRISPR-DO statistics

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Citations per year

Number of citations per year for the bioinformatics software tool CRISPR-DO
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Tool usage distribution map

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CRISPR-DO specifications

Information


Unique identifier OMICS_12378
Name CRISPR-DO
Interface Web user interface
Restrictions to use None
Output data The output of CRISPR-DO contains a table including information and scores for each sgRNA.
Programming languages Python
Computer skills Basic
Version 0.1
Stability Stable
Maintained Yes

Taxon


  • Invertebrates
    • Caenorhabditis elegans
    • Drosophila melanogaster
  • Primates
    • Homo sapiens
  • Rodents
    • Mus musculus
  • Vertebrates
    • Danio rerio

Documentation


Maintainer


  • person_outline Liu Shirley

Information


Unique identifier OMICS_12378
Name CRISPR-DO
Software type Package/Module
Interface Command line interface
Restrictions to use None
Operating system Unix/Linux
Programming languages Python
Computer skills Advanced
Stability Stable
Requirements
bx-Python, tabix, SSC
Maintained Yes

Taxon


  • Invertebrates
    • Caenorhabditis elegans
    • Drosophila melanogaster
  • Primates
    • Homo sapiens
  • Rodents
    • Mus musculus
  • Vertebrates
    • Danio rerio

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Versioning


No version available

Documentation


Maintainer


  • person_outline Liu Shirley

Publication for CRISPR-DO

CRISPR-DO citations

 (3)
library_books

As Technologies for Nucleotide Therapeutics Mature, Products Emerge

2017
Mol Ther Nucleic Acids
PMCID: 5686430
PMID: 29246316
DOI: 10.1016/j.omtn.2017.10.017

[…] Both antisense and ribozymes passed the point of maximum slowing, the established point, in the mid-1990s; RNAi technology reached this point a decade later. Two technologies shown in , microRNA and CRISPR, do not exhibit an exponential pattern of growth and could not be modeled with the TIME model. These more recent technologies exhibit an exponential, or near-exponential, growth pattern charact […]

library_books

The Small, Slow and Specialized CRISPR and Anti CRISPR of Escherichia and Salmonella

2010
PLoS One
PMCID: 2886076
PMID: 20559554
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0011126

[…] implies that spacers are chronological records reflecting previous encounters with mobile genetic elements . However, the loss of one or more repeat-spacer units has been observed. This suggests that CRISPR do not grow unchecked. One would assume that older spacers should be more frequently deleted because they have been inserted for a longer time. Not only older spacers had longer opportunity for […]

library_books

A putative RNA interference based immune system in prokaryotes: computational analysis of the predicted enzymatic machinery, functional analogies with eukaryotic RNAi, and hypothetical mechanisms of action

2006
Biol Direct
PMCID: 1462988
PMID: 16545108
DOI: 10.1186/1745-6150-1-7

[…] ferredoxin-like fold present in RAMPs) and not the formation of secondary structures in the transcribed repeats.Author response: It is hard to see how one excludes the other: it stands to reason that CRISPR do form distinct secondary structures which bind to symmetrical proteins.The model proposed (including possible variation) thus implies many predictions that could be experimentally tested. Sur […]


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CRISPR-DO institution(s)
School of Life Science and Technology, Tongji University, Shanghai, China; Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; Center for Functional Cancer Epigenetics, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA; Division of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China
CRISPR-DO funding source(s)
The project was partially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China [31329003], NIH R01 HG008728, and the Claudia Adams Barr Award in Innovative Basic Cancer Research from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

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